Around three million traffic offences in first four months of 2018

In the first four months of 2018, there were 3,084,414 traffic offences including speeding, jumping red lights and use of handheld mobile phones. This is slightly more than in the same period last year, when 2,938,509 traffic fines were imposed under the Traffic Regulations (Administrative Enforcement) Act (Wet administratiefrechtelijke handhaving verkeersvoorschriften, Wahv). These figures have been published in the first four-monthly summary on traffic fines in 2018*.

In the first four months of 2018, there was an increase in both the number of traffic offences detected by number-plate recognition and the number of times that traffic offenders were stopped as compared with the year before. The largest increase was detected in the number of times that traffic offenders were stopped for use of handheld mobile phones and failing to use bicycle lighting. In the first four months of 2018, 36,661 offences were imposed for use of handheld mobile phones. This is around 25% more than the 27,029 offences in the same period in 2017. Failing to use bicycling lighting was detected in 22,379 offences during the first four-month period of 2018, compared with 13,488 the year before.
 
The majority of traffic offences for speeding were detected through digital devices. In the first four months of 2018, 2,558,671 fines were imposed for speeding compared with 2,468,889 in the same period in 2017. During the first four-month period of 2018, 1,241,398 speeding offences were detected by speed camera, 670,445 by average speed control and 619,608 by mobile radar. As from this year, the mobile radar sets have been included in the regular traffic summaries.

Foreign-based traffic offenders

In the first four months of 2018, 316,691 traffic fines were sent to a foreign-based traffic offender. This is slightly more than the 294,476 fines in the same period in 2017. Here, the percentage increase is roughly equal to the increase in the total number of traffic offences detected in the Netherlands.

*The four-monthly summary of traffic fines is compiled by the Ministry of Justice & Security, the National Police Force, the Central Fine Collection Agency (CJIB) and the Public Prosecution Service (OM) under the Traffic Regulations (Administrative Enforcement) Act (Wahv or Wet Mulder).
 

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