Order of vaccination for people who do not work in healthcare

Vaccination of people who do not work in healthcare began on 18 January 2021. People who have coronavirus cannot be vaccinated until they have recovered. Children and young people under 18 will not be vaccinated for the time being.

Vaccination schedule for people who do not work in healthcare

Who

When

Which vaccine

Where/By whom

Nursing home residents and residents of care homes for people with intellectual disabilities

From 18 January

BioNTech/Pfizer

In-house doctor

People living in small-scale residential homes and residential care homes for people with intellectual disabilities

From late January

BioNTech/Pfizer and Moderna

Family doctor or out-of-hours GP service

People aged 90 and over who live at home and are mobile From late January BioNTech/Pfizer GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)

People aged 65 and over who live at home and who are able to travel to a GGD vaccination centre (from oldest to youngest)

From late January

BioNTech/Pfizer 

GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)

People aged between 60 and 65 (from oldest to youngest)

From mid-February

AstraZeneca

Family doctor

People aged 60 and over (and healthcare workers) on the Wadden Islands 

From mid-February

BioNTech/Pfizer

GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)
family doctor

Mental healthcare inpatients

From late February

Moderna and AstraZeneca

In-house doctor

People aged 65 and over who live at home and who are not able to travel to a GGD vaccination centre (from oldest to youngest)

From March

Moderna

Family doctor

People aged 18-60 with certain medical conditions

From March

BioNTech/Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca

Family doctor

Residents of St Eustatius and Saba (all groups)

From February

Moderna

GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)

Residents of Bonaire aged 60 and over

From February

BioNTech/Pfizer

Family doctor (supported by GGD)

Residents of Curaçao, Aruba and St Maarten aged 60 and over*

From February

BioNTech/Pfizer

GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)

Residents of Bonaire, Curaçao, Aruba and St Maarten aged 18-60*

From May

AstraZeneca

To be decided

People aged 50-59, followed by those aged 18-50 who do not have certain medical conditions

From May

AstraZeneca

GGD vaccination centre (only in Dutch)/
family doctor

* The approach differs between islands. On some islands all groups will be vaccinated at the same time. On other islands, including Curaçao and Aruba, different age groups will be vaccinated in phases.

Order of vaccination may change

The order of vaccination may change if, for example, the supply of vaccine doses is delayed.

Order of vaccination for people who do not work in healthcare

Starting 18 January 2021

  • Nursing home residents and residents of care homes for people with intellectual disabilities. They receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine.

Starting 25 January 2021

  • People living in small-scale residential homes and residential care homes for people with intellectual disabilities. They are given the Moderna vaccine or the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine.
  • People aged 90 and over who are mobile and live at home. The first invitations were sent to this group on 25 January. They receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine at GGD vaccination centres.
  • People aged 65 and over who live at home and are mobile (from oldest to youngest). They receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine.

Starting 1 February 2021

  • People aged between 85 and 90 who are mobile and live at home. They receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine at GGD vaccination centres.

Starting 5 February 2021

  • People aged between 80 and 85 who are mobile and live at home. They receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine at GGD vaccination centres.

Starting mid-February 2021

  • People aged between 60 and 65. They will receive the AstraZeneca vaccine.
  • People aged 60 and over (and healthcare workers) on the Wadden Islands will receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine.
  • Mental healthcare inpatients. They will receive the Moderna or AstraZeneca vaccine.
  • Residents of St Eustatius and Saba (all groups). They will receive the Moderna vaccine. 
  • Residents of Bonaire aged 60 and over will receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine. 
  • Residents of Curaçao, Aruba and St Maarten aged 60 and over. They will receive the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine.

Starting March 2021

  • People aged 90 and over who live at home and are not mobile. They will receive the Moderna vaccine.
  • People aged 65 and over who live at home and are not mobile. They will receive the Moderna vaccine.
  • People aged 18-60 with certain medical conditions. They will receive the BioNTech/Pfizer, Moderna or AstraZeneca vaccine.

Starting May 2021

  • Residents of Bonaire, Curaçao, Aruba and St Maarten aged 18-60 who do not have certain medical conditions. They will receive the AstraZeneca vaccine.
  • People aged aged 50-59, followed by those aged 18-50 who do not have certain medical conditions. They will receive the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Vaccination of people who have or have recovered from COVID-19

The Health Council recommends that people who have had COVID-19 should also be vaccinated.

If you have COVID-19 when your invitation to be vaccinated arrives you must stay at home and you cannot therefore be vaccinated at that time. Vaccination cannot take place until at least four weeks after you developed symptoms. When you no longer have any COVID-19 symptoms, you can make an appointment for your vaccination. The letter inviting you to be vaccinated contains more information.

Vaccination of children and young people under 18

Children and young people under 18 will not be vaccinated for the time being. This is because not all vaccines have been tested on this age group. Only the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine has been found suitable for people aged 16 and over. More research is needed to make sure the vaccines are safe and work for children and young people. When more information becomes available, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) will assess whether a vaccine can be approved for children and young people.

It is also unclear at this stage whether people who have been vaccinated can still infect others. If vaccination stops people being infectious this will help stop the spread of coronavirus. Further research is required on this.

Vaccination of people with an auto-immune disease

It is not yet clear whether the coronavirus vaccines are safe and work for people with an auto-immune disease.